December 22, 2003
Oh Marie! The Meaning and The Expression. And The Napsterization Of It.

Pleasure and pain. Earlier today in spin class, again: Hey hey Marie, Oh Marie In your arms I'm longing to be! Longing to be! (another half turn! off the saddles! double time! no bounce!). I started spin classes six years ago. The spin leaders bring in new music to keep us interested (don't worry, the institution pays the ASCAP etc. fees) on rainy nights. We've all had instances where we first heard a song and it stuck partly because the music arrested us in it's greatness on first listen, partly because of what is going on in the place you hear it, and partly because when it's over, you long to hear it again. Humm it, roll it around in your brain.

And so it was with Louie Prima and Ray Charles. My legs burned, I wasn't bouncing, in total control: Hey hey Marie, Oh Marie! In your arms I'm longing to be, Ah Baby, tell me you love me (Another half turn, level 8, half-time pacing, no bounce, very slow and hard!)

Three times a week. The last two years, with iPod music. Transition to Vanessa May, violinist from the UK, with (I) Can-Can (You) (very fast music, level 1 easy, spinning as fast as you can, out of the saddle, all out, everyone in the room burning up, sweating, furiously pumping the bikes.)

I can listen to Oh Marie outside of spin and not associate it with class (I heard it last month drinking cosmos, eating fresh crab, laughing with very good friends), but the Can-Can is in my spin-only brain.

Music is something I love and want to play conveniently, flexibly, easily, exactly the way I want it, in what order, when and how, 1000 songs on shuffle, for two weeks of music, with no repeats. I don't think anyone would quibble with that desire anymore. Somehow the disruption of the internet on the music business has stuck many of us, because we see the chance to seize the thrill music can generate in your body and your head, in ways that are as easy as they've ever been: rip all your CD's to mp3s (took 6 months, but I did it), and put them all in a software player, and it's effortless. Total control without changing discs, thousands of songs, click. Sumptuous. It's an aural decadence we've never had before. It seems like there was this hidden craving just sitting under the surface, waiting to be satisfied. There are also musicians who want to distribute, on P2P or put things on their websites, cut out the middleman. Their music can get passed around, take advantage of the information flow, where the more they are heard, the more important their music becomes.

So this is the reason Eddan Katz and I started Napsterization.org/stories/ about a year ago . We wanted a place to have people express their excitement about music, digital music, P2P uses that were good and that allowed them to access stuff they'd be hard-pressed to find at the local record shop.

Over the past couple of years, I've realized that there is more there than just the napsterization of entertainment. Digital media, the internet, information technology disrupt everything. And disruption is a good thing. Lower transaction costs for each person, the ease and flexibility of digital communication, to join a political campaign actively but from somewhere away from the campaign, to link up with other folks to let politicians know what you think. Blogging and the disruption to the news media lead to tools to see the "daily us" as Technorati calls it; social software disrupts our real life social networks, while making it easier to connect with some people and see explicitly the relationships; hardware like the iPod and Treo 600 collapse analog barriers and lead to changes in our behavior with techology and media. Napsterization is happening everywhere. So while the blog is for the recording of positive uses of P2P, it's also for the analysis of that, in addition to other situations where napsterization happens.

I'll still write for the bIPlog on IP issues, but check out Napsterization.org too.

Ummm Baby, tell me you love me! Kiss me once while the stars shine above me (Another half turn, find your pace!)

Posted by Mary Hodder at December 22, 2003 11:46 PM | TrackBack
Comments

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Posted by: college loan on October 26, 2005 12:55 PM

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Posted by: college loan on October 26, 2005 12:55 PM
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