Inter(sex)ionality: Asian Voices in Queer Migration

posted March 14, 2013


The Asian American Law Journal at Berkeley Law is proud to present our 20th anniversary symposium, Inter(sex)ionality: Asian Voices in Queer Migration, which will be held from Monday, March 18, 2013 to Thursday, March 21, 2013 on the Berkeley Law campus. This ground breaking symposium asks how our understanding of contemporary political events changes when we simultaneously consider race, gender, sexuality, and immigration status. It complicates hot button topics, including the efficacy of top-down human trafficking laws; the complicated relationship between hate crimes, gay suicides, bullying, and immigration; coalition building between the overlapping Asian, Latino, and Queer communities within the DREAM Act Movement; and the consequences of supporting marriage as the primary vehicle to immigration.

See the full list of programming below. For questions regarding the symposium, please contact our Symposium Editors Micah West, and Samia Hossain or visit the Symposium Facebook Page.

DAY 1: WHAT I LEARNED FROM BEING A MIGRANT SEX WORKER: A CRITIQUE OF US FOREIGN POLICY TOWARD HUMAN TRAFFICKING
*March 18 | 12:45-2 p.m. | 105 Boalt Hall, School of Law*

Professor Rhacel Salazar Parrenas, USC

Prof. Rhacel Parrenas aims to challenge our understanding of human trafficking. She specifically discusses how in imposing top-down legal constraints to solve perceived problems—including laws that push dependence on migrant brokers, guest worker policies that bind migrants to an employer, marriage laws that limit the integration of migrants, and measures that criminalize undocumented migrants—many women become more vulnerable to exploitation, not less.

DAY 2: GAY SUICIDES, BULLYING, & HATE CRIME LEGISLATION
*March 19 | 12:45-2 p.m. | 105 Boalt Hall, School of Law*

Professor Chandan Reddy, University of Washington
Angela Chan, Senior Staff Attorney, Asian Law Caucus

In 2010, Tyler Clementi, an eighteen-year old gay student at Rutgers University, committed suicide after his roommate, Dharun Ravi, used his webcam to view Clementi kissing another man. Clementi’s suicide brought attention to anti-gay bullying across the country and a renewed focus on hate crime legislation. The media focused less attention on Clementi’s roommate, a legal permanent resident from India. Using this event as a case study, Professor Chandan Reddy and Asian Law Caucus Senior Staff Attorney Angela Chan discuss the complicated intersections between race, immigration status, and hate crime legislation.

DAY 3: BUILDING QUEER, ASIAN, & LATINO IMMIGRANT COALITIONS WITHIN THE DREAM ACT MOVEMENT
*March 20 | 12:45-2 p.m. | 100 Boalt Hall, School of Law*

Yahaira Carillo, DREAM Act Activist
Marco Flores, DREAM Act Activist
Luis Liang, DREAM Act Activist
Vanessa Coe, Lead Organizer, API Equality - Northern California

Many in Dream Act the movement have “come out” as undocumented. While the language of “coming out” has received some attention, less attention has been paid to the fact that many within the movement are gay and have come out as both undocumented and gay. How is sexuality implicated in the Dream Act movement? Why do mainstream media associate the movement with Latinos and not Asian immigrants? Our panel discusses the politics within the Dream Act movement, including efforts to bring queer and immigrant rights organizing together.

DAY 4: GAY MARRIAGE, THE NUCLEAR FAMILY, & FAMILY-SPONSORED IMMIGRATION
March 21 | 12:45-2 p.m. | 105 Boalt Hall, School of Law

Pooja Gehi, Director of Litigation & Advocacy, Sylvia Rivera Law Project
Dr. Yasmin Nair, Chicago-Based Writer, Academic, Activist, and Commentator
Olga Tomchin, Law Student, Berkeley Law
Professor Rose Villazor, University of California, Davis, School of Law

President Obama is advocating for comprehensive immigration reform to include bi-national gay couples that want to sponsor their partners for immigration like married heterosexual couples, renewing focus on family reunification, the primary vehicle for immigrating to the United States. While family-sponsored immigration may help bi-national couples, it also fails to recognize that many LGBT people are trying to escape violence and discrimination within their own families. Professor Rose Villazor moderates a panel discussing how the current focus on gay marriage and family-sponsored immigration affect gay immigrants.


« Back to all announcements
June 2011

Volume 18

Volume 18 was produced during the 2010-2011 school year.

[READ MORE]

Donate to AALJ
Submissions